Physicochemical, nutritional and health-related component characterization of the underutilized Mexican serviceberry fruit [




Physicochemical, nutritional and health-related component<br /> characterization of the underutilized Mexican serviceberry fruit [Malacomeles<br /> denticulata (Kunth) G. N. <span id="more-30523"></span>Jones] | Fruits | Cambridge Core





Physicochemical, nutritional and health-related component
characterization of the underutilized Mexican serviceberry fruit [Malacomeles
denticulata
(Kunth) G. N. Jones]

– Volume 69 Issue 1 – María C. Cazares-Franco, Carlos Ramírez-Chimal, María G. Herrera-Hernández, Carlos A. Núñez-Colín, Miguel A. Hernández-Martínez, Salvador H. Guzmán-Maldonado”>





















We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites. Close this message to accept cookies or find out how to manage your cookie settings.

  • (a1)
    1


    Div. Cienc. Salud Ing., Campus Celaya-Salvatierra, Univ. Guanajuato
    , Av. Juan Paplo II s/n, Celaya, Gto,

    México

  • (a2)
    2


    Univ. Politéc. Guanajuato. Ave. Univ. Norte s/n. Juan Alonso, Cortazar
    , Guanajuato,

    México
    , CP 38483

  • (a3)
    3


    Unidad Biotecnol., Campo Exp. Bajío (INIFAP), km. 6.5 Carretera Celaya, San Miguel Allende s/n
    , Celaya, Gto.,

    México
    , CP 38110. horaciossgm@live.com.mx, guzman.horacio@inifap.gob.mx

  • (a4)
    4


    Programa Frut., Campo Exp. Bajío (INIFAP), km. 6.5 Carretera Celaya, San Miguel Allende s/n
    , Celaya, Gto.,

    México
    , CP 38110

  • (a5)
    5


    Programa Agrofor., Campo Exp. Bajío (INIFAP)
    , km. 6.5 Carretera Celaya, San Miguel Allende s/n, Celaya, Gto.,

    México
    , CP 38110

Abstract

Introduction. The nutritional and functional qualities of wild and cultivated Mexican serviceberry have not yet been reported. This species could have similar potential for commercialization to that of Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia Nutt.). Materials and methods. Wild and cultivated fruits at two maturity stages were assessed for CIE Lab color, fruit size, titratable acidity and total soluble solids. Also, chemical composition and mineral contents were determined. In addition, vitamin C and simple phenols were assessed. Total soluble phenols, condensed tannins and anthocyanins as well as Trolox antioxidant activity and oxygen radical antioxidant activity were determined. Results. Fruit size, titratable acidity, total soluble solids, iron and simple phenols were higher in fruits of cultivated plants than in those of wild plants. Total fiber, calcium, vitamin C, total soluble phenols and condensed tannins were higher in wild fruits. Wild and cultivated serviceberry showed higher Trolox antioxidant activity compared with oxygen radical antioxidant activity. Caffeic, chlorogenic, coumaric and syringic acids and rutin were the predominant simple phenolics; they comprised from 59.3% (cultivated overripe fruit) to 76.9% (wild ripe fruit) of the sum of simple phenolics. The antioxidant activity of wild and cultivated fruit (258.3–699.2 mmol·kg–1, fw) is up to 3.8 times higher compared with those of fruits commonly consumed. Conclusion. Contents of antioxidant compounds and the outstanding antioxidant activities of wild and cultivated Mexican serviceberry make this species a natural resource that could contribute to health.

Introduction. The nutritional and functional qualities of wild and cultivated Mexican serviceberry have not yet been reported. This species could have similar potential for commercialization to that of Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia Nutt.). Materials and methods. Wild and cultivated fruits at two maturity stages were assessed for CIE Lab color, fruit size, titratable acidity and total soluble solids. Also, chemical composition and mineral contents were determined. In addition, vitamin C and simple phenols were assessed. Total soluble phenols, condensed tannins and anthocyanins as well as Trolox antioxidant activity and oxygen radical antioxidant activity were determined. Results. Fruit size, titratable acidity, total soluble solids, iron and simple phenols were higher in fruits of cultivated plants than in those of wild plants. Total fiber, calcium, vitamin C, total soluble phenols and condensed tannins were higher in wild fruits. Wild and cultivated serviceberry showed higher Trolox antioxidant activity compared with oxygen radical antioxidant activity. Caffeic, chlorogenic, coumaric and syringic acids and rutin were the predominant simple phenolics; they comprised from 59.3% (cultivated overripe fruit) to 76.9% (wild ripe fruit) of the sum of simple phenolics. The antioxidant activity of wild and cultivated fruit (258.3–699.2 mmol·kg–1, fw) is up to 3.8 times higher compared with those of fruits commonly consumed. Conclusion. Contents of antioxidant compounds and the outstanding antioxidant activities of wild and cultivated Mexican serviceberry make this species a natural resource that could contribute to health.

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation’s collection.

Fruits

  • ISSN: 0248-1294
  • EISSN: 1625-967X
  • URL: /core/journals/fruits

Metrics

Full text views

Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views:
0
Total number of PDF views:
21 *

Loading metrics…

Abstract views

Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Total abstract views:
20 *

Loading metrics…

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 – 7th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.